MY BROTHER’S SUMMER
MY BROTHER’S SUMMER
MY BROTHER’S SUMMER
MY BROTHER’S SUMMER
MY BROTHER’S SUMMER
MY BROTHER’S SUMMER

MY BROTHER’S SUMMER

by Pietro Reggiani

2005 Tribeca film festival
“competition” section

Synopsis

Verona, 1970. Young Sergio is not at ease with the world and prefers keeping to himself and his daydreams. When his parents, during a summer spent in the country, tell him that he is going to have a little brother, he begins to daydream and ends up imagining himself burning his brother alive on a grill. A few days later, when his mother suffers a miscarriage, little Sergio comes face to face his tremendous sense of guilt.

 Tribeca Film Festival 2005 (New York), (Special Mention of the Jury – Best Feature)
Festival du Monde di Montreal 2005, (Special Mention Best First Time Feature)

Bergamo Film Meeting 2005, miglior film (Best Feature) Festival del cinema indipendente di Foggia 2005, miglior film
Chieti Film Festival 2005, miglior film
Cinema a mezzogiorno – Torella dei Lombardi 2005 (Avellino), miglior film
Missing film festival – Genova 2005, miglior film
Sulmona Cinema Film Festival 2005 (L’Aquila), Best Actor in a Leading Role
Festival del cinema italiano di Gallio 2005 (Vicenza),Best Screenplay
Zion International Film Festival 2005 (Utah), Audience Award
Festival internazionale del cinema delle culture mediterranee – Bosa Marina 2005 (Sassari),Special Mention

 Shanghai International Film Festival 2005, Italian Focus
Gent International Film Festival, Panorama
Oulu Children International Film Festival, Antalya International Film Festival
Bend International Film Festival, Port Townsend International Film Festival – Concorso
Daytona Beach International Film Festival – Concorso
Annapolis International Film Festival
Rehoboth Beach International Film Festival
Sedona International Film Festival 2006
Tiburon International Film Festival
Stockolm Junior International Film Festival
NatFilmFest Copenhagen
 ”A film different from any other… the style swings between reality and dream, deep feelings and fun in a very successful way.”
(Lietta Tornabuoni, La Stampa)
“Unassuming but oddly effective Italian curio offers a deadpan, straight-ahead look at childhood imagination.”
(Ronnie Scheib, Variety)